Great Islandora sites, described by their owners.

Upcoming Webinar: Paged and Complex Content in Islandora 8

Islandora 8 was released last June without built-in support for paged content. Our community placed a very high priority on correcting that omission and getting books and newspapers ready for migration from collections in islandora 7. Thanks to an incredibly successful community sprint back in September, paged content is in!

Upcoming Webinar: Islandora 8 at UNLV

We will be kicking off 2020 with another Islandora 8 webinar showcasing a pilot site. One of the earliest adopters of Islandora 8, and an integral part of its development so far, the University of Nevada Las Vegas will join us on January 21, 2020 to showcase the results of their migration. They will discuss why they chose to go with Islandora 8 back in early 2018, what they have learned so far, and what's coming next for UNLV.

Registration is free. Sign up now.

Taking Islandora to Twitter: YUDLbot & friends

We're taking this week's blog spot to highlight a nifty little tool for Islandora that anyone can adopt: YUDLbot. Short for York University Digital Library bot, the YUDLbot was written by Nick Ruest to take objects from York's Islandora repository and tweet them hourly, using the object description as the body of the tweet and linking back to the object in the repo. Randomly trolling through such an extensive repository turns up some pretty fun things, such as:

Islandora Show and Tell: Fundación Juan March

A couple of week ago we kicked off Islandora Show and Tell by looking at a newly launched site: Barnard Digital Collection. This week, we're going to take a look at a long-standing Islandora site that has been one of our standard answers when someone asks "What's a great Islandora site?" - Fundación Juan March, which will, to our great fortune, be the host of the next European Islandora Camp, set for May 27 - 29, 2015.

It was a foregone conclusion that once we launched this series, we would be featuring FJM sooner rather than later, but it happens that we're visiting them just as they have launched a new collection: La saga Fernández-Shaw y el teatro lírico, containing three archives of a family of Spanish playwrights. This collection is also a great example of why we love this site: innovative browsing tools such as a timeline viewer, carefully curated collections spanning a wide varieties of objects types living side-by-side (the Knowledge Protal approach really makes this work), and seamless multi-language support.